¿"Solo invitación" implica beta? [cerrado]

I released an iPhone app in the App store and just heard it had been rejected. In their communication, Apple explains it was not accepted because, as the iOS guidelines stipulate, "2.9: Apps that are “beta”, “demo”, “trial”, or “test” versions will be rejected"

In their message, they pointed a screenshot of my app referring to my "login or request an invite" screen... which they didn't like.

It's important for me to keep the application by invitation only because there is a social aspect to it, and our early usability testing showed that people who had some connections in the app were much more likely to use it than people using the app by themselves. Without a network, people just don't use the application as much (it would be like using Facebook by yourself...).

Después checking wikipedia, I don't see that "invitation only" implies "beta", "demo", or "test". So I am not sure whether the assumption that "invite only implies beta, demo, or test" is really fair. Plus there are a bunch of apps in the App Store that are invitation only (Pinterest is probably the most famous one).

So, here are 3 questions:

  1. Does "invitation only" really imply "beta", "test", "demo"?
  2. What are good examples of apps / websites that are invitation only but not beta?
  3. How did you / would you get your invitation only apps accepted in the app store?

preguntado el 01 de febrero de 12 a las 03:02

Ok, remove the invitation only and create a sign-up, and just charge a ridiculously large amount to sign up? :-) -

3 Respuestas

I released an iPhone app in the App store and just heard it had been rejected. In their communication, Apple explains it was not accepted because, as the iOS guidelines stipulate, "2.9: Apps that are “beta”, “demo”, “trial”, or “test” versions will be rejected"

In other words, apps must be ready for general release.

It's important for me to keep the application by invitation only because there is a social aspect to it, and our early usability testing showed that people who had some connections in the app were much more likely to use it than people using the app by themselves. Without a network, people just don't use the application as much (it would be like using Facebook by yourself...).

In other words, it's not ready for general release.

Respondido 01 Feb 12, 07:02

David has a point. Maybe this is more of a beta after all. If so have you looked into releasing it internally? You can release the app to up to 100 people by asking them for their UUID and then making a cert that allows those 100 people to install the app. I strongly recommend using testflightapp.com to manage these beta releases. It allows a user to install from an email without needing iTunes. - w.donahue

It does not matter what you think implies "beta" or what wikipedia thinks. All that matters is what apple says. It is their app store and they hold all the keys. If apple says they won't approve it the way it is then change it and try again. I would just try changing the words "Request an Invite" to "Create Account"

I have had similar experience where I got rejected for something in my app that I saw dozens of other approved apps doing. The bottom line is their enforcement of policy is inconstant and large name brand apps tend to be allowed to break the rules, while small apps are held to a more strict standard.

Also realize when apple tests the code they will need to be able to easily create an account. Or they will need you to provide them with a test account in the testing instructions you provide to them. If one of the two of these is not in place then they will reject it because they have no way to test it.

Respondido 01 Feb 12, 07:02

Sadly the term "beta" no longer means testing. I blame Google for releasing so many products claiming they are beta when they are clearly complete, just invitation only. But that is the nature of beta: performing usability testing like Wikipedia says. You're right that invite only doesn't mean beta in a literal sense, but that's how the word is used unfortunately.

Like metalideath said, Apple makes the rules and Apple enforces the rules so you would have to send your complaints to Apple.

  1. No.
  2. Apple employees approves them.

Respondido 01 Feb 12, 07:02

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